Exihibitions

Virtual Anthropology Museum

Human Evolution

This exciting collaboration between researchers and lecturers at LJMU and the World Museum will take visitors through seven million years of evolution – from the very early beginnings in Africa, right up to today, and asks – “What does it mean to be human?”

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Anthropology & Disease

Palaeopathology is the study of disease in ancient populations. Using modern clinical data, we are able to identify pathologies that affect the human skeleton. This enables us to trace the history of disease in the past, and its effect on the population. Being able to identify disease in the skeleton can be also very useful in forensic cases: a correct diagnosis of a pathology can lead to a positive identification.

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Crime & Punishment

Forensic anthropologists work in conjunction with forensic pathologists to identify remains based on their skeletal characteristics. The methods used to identity a person from a skeleton relies on the past contributions of various anthropologists and the study of human skeletal differences. Through the collection of thousands of specimens and the analysis of differences within a population, estimations of age and sex can be made based on physical characteristics.

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Growing Up In Gloucester

Biological anthropologists can piece together a story of life for the inhabitants of an area, and witness the changes that occurred throughout time. Using bones they can discover the way people lived, what they ate, the struggles they endured, the jobs they did, and finally how they died.

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The Anthropologist

The study of anthropology is concerned both with the biological features that make us human (such as physiology, genetic makeup, nutritional history and evolution) and with social aspects (such as language, culture, politics, family and religion). A few common questions posed by anthropology are: how are societies different and how are they the same? How has evolution shaped us? What is culture? Are there human universals?

< Visit Exhibition >

Human Evolution

This exciting collaboration between researchers and lecturers at LJMU and the World Museum will take visitors through seven million years of evolution – from the very early beginnings in Africa, right up to today, and asks – “What does it mean to be human?”

VISIT EXHIBITION »

Anthropology & Disease

Palaeopathology is the study of disease in ancient populations. Using modern clinical data, we are able to identify pathologies that affect the human skeleton. This enables us to trace the history of disease in the past, and its effect on the population. Being able to identify disease in the skeleton can be also very useful in forensic cases: a correct diagnosis of a pathology can lead to a positive identification.

VISIT EXHIBITION »

Crime & Punishment

Forensic anthropologists work in conjunction with forensic pathologists to identify remains based on their skeletal characteristics. The methods used to identity a person from a skeleton relies on the past contributions of various anthropologists and the study of human skeletal differences. Through the collection of thousands of specimens and the analysis of differences within a population, estimations of age and sex can be made based on physical characteristics.

VISIT EXHIBITION »

Growing Up In Gloucester

Biological anthropologists can piece together a story of life for the inhabitants of an area, and witness the changes that occurred throughout time. Using bones they can discover the way people lived, what they ate, the struggles they endured, the jobs they did, and finally how they died.

VISIT EXHIBITION »

The Anthropologist

The study of anthropology is concerned both with the biological features that make us human (such as physiology, genetic makeup, nutritional history and evolution) and with social aspects (such as language, culture, politics, family and religion). A few common questions posed by anthropology are: how are societies different and how are they the same? How has evolution shaped us? What is culture? Are there human universals?

VISIT EXHIBITION »

DigiArt Project is funded by the European Commision under grant number 665066

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